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Concrete Slab Cost & Prices

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Concrete Slab Cost & Prices

There are numerous reasons you might want to put a concrete slab on your property. The durability and versatility of concrete make it a great choice for a wide variety of projects. It could serve as a driveway, patio, basketball court and so much more. However, before you start enjoying your new addition, you have to plan and budget accordingly. Proper budgeting involves understanding what your slab will cost and what factors influence that price.

These days, the typical concrete slab price will fall anywhere between $4 and $8 per square foot, including labor costs. This estimate also includes the price of cement, a key component of concrete. The typical cement price is between $1 and $5 per square foot.

How much you spend on your project will depend a great deal on factors such as the thickness of the slab, the total area it will cover and whether or not it needs special reinforcement such as rebar or wire mesh. Compared to other materials, however, a concrete slab’s cost per square foot is more affordable and delivers a good return on investment.

Where Do You Need a Slab?

There are many places around your property where the cost to pour a concrete slab would be worthwhile. The durability, versatility and easy maintenance of this material make it a great choice for building some important features of your home, including:

  • Patio: The ideal spot for a family cookout, a patio can enhance the look of your property with specialized finishing. By adding color or stamping to give it the appearance of stone or brick, you can bring some visual interest to the backyard.
  • Shed: Putting a shed on your property gives you plenty of extra storage. Adding a concrete base can help protect the floor from moisture and give it added stability.
  • Garage floor: Hiring a professional contractor to pour a concrete floor in the garage can give you the parking and storage space you’ve been missing. Plus, sealing it with a coat of epoxy helps protect it and give it a more interesting look.

How Much Does Concrete Cost?

The average cost of a concrete slab can vary quite a bit depending on how large it will be and the type of materials you want to use. Some of the most common sizes and their approximate costs can be found in the table below:

Size (in feet)

Approximate Cost

10x10

$600

12x12

$865

12x20

$1,440

20x20

$2,400

24x24

$3,460

20x30

$3,600

25x25

$3,750

20x40

$4,800

30x30

$5,400

30x40

$7,200

30x50

$9,000

40x40

$9,600

40x60

$14,400

40x80

$19,200

In addition to the square footage, another factor that will influence your concrete slab installation cost is its thickness. For example, a patio or basketball court most likely won’t need to be much thicker than 3 inches. However, a driveway or other surface that will experience heavy usage may need to be as thick as 6 inches.

You’ll also need to consider other supplies, such as wood for framing or rebar for reinforcement. The contractor you hire should add these materials to the concrete cost for your job.

Concrete Vs. Asphalt

Although many homeowners choose to use asphalt instead of concrete, this is not always the best choice. Here are the primary differences between asphalt and concrete:

  • Cost: In general, asphalt is less expensive than concrete. The average cost for an asphalt driveway is roughly $2 to $5 per square foot.
  • Maintenance and upkeep: Although asphalt requires more regular maintenance than concrete, the work is usually less involved. Cracks and holes can be filled with relative ease. Concrete is more durable and typically needs less upkeep, but it is tougher to repair when it needs to be fixed.
  • Longevity: An asphalt surface will usually last up to 20 years, whereas the lifespan of a concrete slab could be up to 30 years. Both can be resurfaced, which can cost a lot — though it is still less than the cost of a new installation.

Other Driveway Surfaces

If you’re still trying to determine which type of material is right for your driveway or other project, here are some points to consider.

Gravel

Gravel is the cheapest option, but it will never be as solid or smooth as concrete. Also, you’ll need to take more care with it because it can get washed away or overgrown with plants.

Pavers

Although these can be an elegant choice, pavers come at a much higher price on average. These stones can run up to $50 per square foot, depending on the style you choose.

Flagstone

This natural sandstone material looks great, but the material and labor costs for installing it over a large area make it prohibitively expensive for many homeowners.

Flooring on Concrete

One of the best features of concrete is that you can install flooring on top of it. Some of the most popular choices for a concrete substrate include laminate, wood, rubber tile, carpeting, ceramic tile, and vinyl tile.

Types and Grades of Concrete

If you’re still considering whether concrete is right for your project, it’s important to note that not all types are created equal. If you decide to go with a cheaper material to save a little money upfront, you could end up paying for it later.

Concrete Grades

The three main concrete grades are:

  • High-strength: This is typically used in foundations for large buildings.
  • Commercial grade: Most concrete slabs are made from this type of concrete. It is sturdy enough to work as a driveway, but not to hold an entire building.
  • Basic: The lowest grade available, this is best suited for pouring walkways or patios that won’t need to support heavy objects or experience heavy wear and tear.

In addition to the grade of the material, the ratio of water, cement and aggregate also has an effect on the strength of the finished product. Be sure to ask your contractor about what will work best for your plans.

<h3>Concrete Types

There are many varieties of concrete, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. The most common of these include:

  • Regular
  • Decorative
  • Stamped
  • Roll compacted
  • Reinforced
  • Limecrete
  • Self-consolidating
  • Pervious
  • Glass
  • Polymer
  • Asphalt
  • Geopolymer
  • High performance
  • Micro-reinforced ultra-performance
  • Rapid set

As with most projects, a skilled, professional contractor should be able to guide you in the direction that best meets your needs.

Find A Pro

No matter what type of project you’re dreaming of, the best way to get it done is to put it in the hands of a professional. An experienced concrete contractor has the skills and expertise necessary to ensure the best results.

Concrete Slab FAQs

How long will the concrete need to cure?

Even though most concrete sets in only a few hours, it can take up to a full week before it is completely cured and ready to use. The amount poured and the temperature outside can have an effect on the duration.

Do I need to have reinforcement added to my slab?

Rebar or wire mesh can add to the strength of your concrete and prevent it from pulling apart. However, it adds to the cost and may not be necessary. It’s best to ask your contractor before making a decision.

Am I stuck with gray concrete?

Absolutely not! In addition to additives that can color the concrete while it is still wet, there are a number of paints, stains, and epoxies that you can apply after it cures. Ask your contractor or local home improvement store for recommendations.

How do I take care of my slab?

You can apply a sealant to keep it safe from the elements, but even without this, the concrete should be strong enough to withstand general wear and tear. Avoid using harsh chemicals to clean and de-ice it and you should be fine.

Concrete Slab Cost & Prices

Get free estimates from local Masonry contractors.

Or, call us to get free estimates (833) 915-1318.

National Masonry Costs

$4 per sq. ft. Minimum Cost
$8 per sq. ft. Maximum Cost

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Concrete Slab Cost & Prices

There are numerous reasons you might want to put a concrete slab on your property. The durability and versatility of concrete make it a great choice for a wide variety of projects. It could serve as a driveway, patio, basketball court and so much more. However, before you start enjoying your new addition, you have to plan and budget accordingly. Proper budgeting involves understanding what your slab will cost and what factors influence that price.

These days, the typical concrete slab price will fall anywhere between $4 and $8 per square foot, including labor costs. This estimate also includes the price of cement, a key component of concrete. The typical cement price is between $1 and $5 per square foot.

How much you spend on your project will depend a great deal on factors such as the thickness of the slab, the total area it will cover and whether or not it needs special reinforcement such as rebar or wire mesh. Compared to other materials, however, a concrete slab’s cost per square foot is more affordable and delivers a good return on investment.

Where Do You Need a Slab?

There are many places around your property where the cost to pour a concrete slab would be worthwhile. The durability, versatility and easy maintenance of this material make it a great choice for building some important features of your home, including:

  • Patio: The ideal spot for a family cookout, a patio can enhance the look of your property with specialized finishing. By adding color or stamping to give it the appearance of stone or brick, you can bring some visual interest to the backyard.
  • Shed: Putting a shed on your property gives you plenty of extra storage. Adding a concrete base can help protect the floor from moisture and give it added stability.
  • Garage floor: Hiring a professional contractor to pour a concrete floor in the garage can give you the parking and storage space you’ve been missing. Plus, sealing it with a coat of epoxy helps protect it and give it a more interesting look.

How Much Does Concrete Cost?

The average cost of a concrete slab can vary quite a bit depending on how large it will be and the type of materials you want to use. Some of the most common sizes and their approximate costs can be found in the table below:

Size (in feet)

Approximate Cost

10x10

$600

12x12

$865

12x20

$1,440

20x20

$2,400

24x24

$3,460

20x30

$3,600

25x25

$3,750

20x40

$4,800

30x30

$5,400

30x40

$7,200

30x50

$9,000

40x40

$9,600

40x60

$14,400

40x80

$19,200

In addition to the square footage, another factor that will influence your concrete slab installation cost is its thickness. For example, a patio or basketball court most likely won’t need to be much thicker than 3 inches. However, a driveway or other surface that will experience heavy usage may need to be as thick as 6 inches.

You’ll also need to consider other supplies, such as wood for framing or rebar for reinforcement. The contractor you hire should add these materials to the concrete cost for your job.

Concrete Vs. Asphalt

Although many homeowners choose to use asphalt instead of concrete, this is not always the best choice. Here are the primary differences between asphalt and concrete:

  • Cost: In general, asphalt is less expensive than concrete. The average cost for an asphalt driveway is roughly $2 to $5 per square foot.
  • Maintenance and upkeep: Although asphalt requires more regular maintenance than concrete, the work is usually less involved. Cracks and holes can be filled with relative ease. Concrete is more durable and typically needs less upkeep, but it is tougher to repair when it needs to be fixed.
  • Longevity: An asphalt surface will usually last up to 20 years, whereas the lifespan of a concrete slab could be up to 30 years. Both can be resurfaced, which can cost a lot — though it is still less than the cost of a new installation.

Other Driveway Surfaces

If you’re still trying to determine which type of material is right for your driveway or other project, here are some points to consider.

Gravel

Gravel is the cheapest option, but it will never be as solid or smooth as concrete. Also, you’ll need to take more care with it because it can get washed away or overgrown with plants.

Pavers

Although these can be an elegant choice, pavers come at a much higher price on average. These stones can run up to $50 per square foot, depending on the style you choose.

Flagstone

This natural sandstone material looks great, but the material and labor costs for installing it over a large area make it prohibitively expensive for many homeowners.

Flooring on Concrete

One of the best features of concrete is that you can install flooring on top of it. Some of the most popular choices for a concrete substrate include laminate, wood, rubber tile, carpeting, ceramic tile, and vinyl tile.

Types and Grades of Concrete

If you’re still considering whether concrete is right for your project, it’s important to note that not all types are created equal. If you decide to go with a cheaper material to save a little money upfront, you could end up paying for it later.

Concrete Grades

The three main concrete grades are:

  • High-strength: This is typically used in foundations for large buildings.
  • Commercial grade: Most concrete slabs are made from this type of concrete. It is sturdy enough to work as a driveway, but not to hold an entire building.
  • Basic: The lowest grade available, this is best suited for pouring walkways or patios that won’t need to support heavy objects or experience heavy wear and tear.

In addition to the grade of the material, the ratio of water, cement and aggregate also has an effect on the strength of the finished product. Be sure to ask your contractor about what will work best for your plans.

<h3>Concrete Types

There are many varieties of concrete, each with unique advantages and disadvantages. The most common of these include:

  • Regular
  • Decorative
  • Stamped
  • Roll compacted
  • Reinforced
  • Limecrete
  • Self-consolidating
  • Pervious
  • Glass
  • Polymer
  • Asphalt
  • Geopolymer
  • High performance
  • Micro-reinforced ultra-performance
  • Rapid set

As with most projects, a skilled, professional contractor should be able to guide you in the direction that best meets your needs.

Find A Pro

No matter what type of project you’re dreaming of, the best way to get it done is to put it in the hands of a professional. An experienced concrete contractor has the skills and expertise necessary to ensure the best results.

Concrete Slab FAQs

How long will the concrete need to cure?

Even though most concrete sets in only a few hours, it can take up to a full week before it is completely cured and ready to use. The amount poured and the temperature outside can have an effect on the duration.

Do I need to have reinforcement added to my slab?

Rebar or wire mesh can add to the strength of your concrete and prevent it from pulling apart. However, it adds to the cost and may not be necessary. It’s best to ask your contractor before making a decision.

Am I stuck with gray concrete?

Absolutely not! In addition to additives that can color the concrete while it is still wet, there are a number of paints, stains, and epoxies that you can apply after it cures. Ask your contractor or local home improvement store for recommendations.

How do I take care of my slab?

You can apply a sealant to keep it safe from the elements, but even without this, the concrete should be strong enough to withstand general wear and tear. Avoid using harsh chemicals to clean and de-ice it and you should be fine.

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